10 REASONS TO WORK WITH A PERSONAL TRAINER IN LOS ANGELES

There are a few things that may initially turnoff people from hiring a personal trainer, like cost or the daunting image of them pushing clients to near collapse. The benefits, however, of using a personal trainer should be considered carefully, because they're plentiful. There are personal trainers to suit every personality and fitness type, be that aggressive "tough love" motivation or gentler, nurturing support. A personal trainer's goal is to help their clients achieve specific fitness goals effectively, efficiently, and without injury. Understanding the potential benefits of a personal trainer can help you decide if the financial investment is worthwhile.Goal Achievement

GOALS:

Personalized WorkoutA personal trainer helps you define individual fitness goals and creates a roadmap to get there. She takes into account your current fitness level and discusses what you ultimately want to achieve. A personal trainer will help you focus on smaller goals that are specific and realistic; they're more attainable, setting you up to achieve the larger, more audacious goal. The personal trainer also helps assess your progress toward those goals and can hold you accountable.

Personalized Workout

Personal trainers create a specific workout plan just for you based on the goals you want to achieve. This isn't a one-size-fits-all workout routine you'd find in a book or magazine. The personalized plan is tailored to your goals, needs, and allowances for your current physical condition and medical background. Your personal trainer can make accommodations to the program if you have an injury, bad back or knees, or aversion to something like water.

Instruction

A professional trainer teaches the proper way to perform each exercise movement in your routine. She demonstrates the movement, coaches you through it, and corrects any issues with your posture or technique. Learning how to perform exercises properly reduces your risk of injury and increases the movement's efficacy. When you can perform a move the right way, it increases the likelihood that you'll do it on your own at home or at the gym after your training sessions.

Motivation

Motivation is often difficult to maintain when you exercise on your own. Regular sessions with a personal trainer create accountability, which is a real motivator to not let down yourself or them. But there's also something to be said for feeding that part of our brain that craves praise. Hearing a personal trainer celebrate your consistency, progress, or even proper technique can be a real boost when you feel like throwing in the towel.

Accountability

If you lack commitment, self-motivation, or just the ability to kick your own self in the pants, a personal trainer could be key to getting your new fitness routine off the ground. When you exercise on your own, it is easier to skip a session here and there or fall off the wagon completely since there's no one to hold you to your actions. When you work with a personal trainer, whether you don't want to lose the money or don't want to let them down, you're far more likely to show up and do the work.

Variety

If your workouts have previously felt complacent, an experienced personal trainer ensures you won't be bored anytime soon. They teach a variety of exercise methods, and with some personal trainers, no two sessions will look the same. Between machines, body weight exercises, free weights, and props like balls and straps, there's no end to the combinations you could be working on. Personal trainers also help you to make adjustments as your fitness level improves to ensure continued progress; so you won't plateau or feel stuck in the same old routine.

Efficiency

An experienced personal trainer will make the most of your workout time, which increases the efficiency of your exercise program. This is especially beneficial when you have a limited amount of time to exercise. They'll know how to optimize every minute you have available in the gym to get the biggest burn for your buck.



THE BENEFITS OF STRENGTH TRAINING

If you knew that a certain type of exercise could benefit your heart, improve your balance, strengthen your bones, and help you lose weight all while making you look and feel better, wouldn't you want to get started? Well, studies show that strength training can provide all those benefits and more. And finding a personal trainer to help you will help you reach your fitness goals even faster.

Strength training — also known as weight or resistance training — is physical activity designed to improve muscular fitness by exercising a specific muscle or muscle group against external resistance, including free-weights, weight machines, or your own body weight, according to the definition from the American College of Sports Medicine. (1)

“The basic principle is to apply a load and overload the muscle so it needs to adapt and get stronger,” explains Neal Pire, CSCS, an exercise physiologist and the national director of wellness services at Castle Connolly Private Health Partners in New York City.

And what’s important for everyone to know is that strength training is not just about body builders lifting weights in a gym. Regular strength or resistance training also helps prevent the natural loss of lean muscle mass that comes with aging (the medical term for this loss is sarcopenia). Preventing injury is crucial. So find the right personal trainer is also crucial.

That means it's an important part of your overall fitness and it benefits people of all ages, plus it may be particularly important for people with health issues such as obesity, arthritis, or a heart condition. The Centers for Disease Control Prevention physical activity guidelines recommend that adults do muscle-strengthening activities on at least two or more days each week (targeting the legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms). (2)

How Strength Training Helps Your Health

Besides the well-touted (and frequently Instagrammed) benefit of adding tone and definition to your muscles, how does strength training help? Here are just a few of the many ways.

1. Strength training makes you stronger and fitter.

This benefit is the obvious one, but it shouldn’t be overlooked. “Muscle strength is crucial in making it easier to do the things you need to do on a day-to-day basis,” Pire says — especially as we get older and naturally start to lose muscle.

Strength training is also called resistance training because it involves strengthening and toning your muscles by contracting them against a resisting force. There are two types of resistance training: (3)

  • Isometric resistance involves contracting your muscles against a nonmoving object, such as against the floor in a push-up.

  • Isotonic strength training involves contracting your muscles through a range of motion as in weight lifting.

2. Strength training protects bone health and muscle mass.

At around age 30 we start losing as much as 3 to 5 percent of lean muscle mass per year thanks to aging. (4)

According to a study published in October 2017 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, just 30 minutes twice a week of high intensity resistance and impact training was shown to improve functional performance, as well as bone density, structure, and strength in postmenopausal women with low bone mass — and it had no negative effects. (5)

3. Strength training helps keep the weight off for good. 

Aerobic exercise such as walking, running, and cycling is well known as a way to help increase the number of calories you burn in a day and shed extra pounds. But strength training helps, too (even if you’re not burning a huge number of calories during the workout).

Exercise science researchers suspect strength training is helpful for weight loss because it helps increase your resting metabolism (meaning the rate at which your body burns calories when you’re just going about your day, not exercising).

A study published in the journal Obesity in November 2017 found that, compared with dieters who didn’t exercise and those who did only aerobic exercise, dieters who did strength training exercises four times a week for 18 months lost the most fat (about 18 pounds, compared with 10 pounds for nonexercisers and 16 pounds for aerobic exercisers). (6)

4. Strength training helps you develop better body mechanics.

Strength training also benefits your balance, coordination, and posture. (7) One study showed that in older people who are at higher risk of falling (and causing a lot of damage) because of worse physical functioning, strength training reduced risk of falling by 40 percent compared with individuals who did not do strength-training exercise. (8)

“Balance is dependent on the strength of the muscles that keep you on your feet,” Pire notes. “The stronger those muscles, the better your balance.”

5. Strength training can help with chronic disease management.

Studies have documented the many wellness benefits of strength training, including helping people with some chronic diseases manage their conditions. If you have arthritis, strength training can be as effective as medication in decreasing arthritis pain. (9)

And for the 14 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, strength training along with other healthy lifestyle changes can help improve glucose control. (10)

6. Strength training boosts energy levels and improves your mood.

Strength training will elevate your level of  endorphins (natural opiates produced by the brain), which lift energy levels and improve mood. (11) As if that isn't enough to convince you, there’s evidence strength training may help you sleep better, too. (12)

7. Strength training translates to more calories burned.

Strength training helps boost your metabolism (the rate your resting body burns calories throughout the day). But weight or resistance training can help boost your calorie burn during and after your workout, too.

You burn calories during strength training, and your body continues to burn calories after strength training (just like you do after aerobic exercise), a process called "excess post-exercise oxygen consumption" or EPOC, according to the American Council on Exercise. (13) When you do strength, weight, or resistance training, your body demands more energy based on how much energy you’re exerting (meaning the tougher you’re working, the more energy is demanded). That means more calories burned during the workout, and more calories burned after the workout, too, while your body is recovering to a resting state.

Getting Started: How to Add Strength Training to Your Routine

If you’re looking to add strength or resistance training to your routine you have a lot of options, Pire notes. You definitely don’t need a gym membership or expensive weight machines, he adds. “Squatting on a chair at home, push-ups, planks, or other movements that require you to use your own body weight as resistance be very effective.”

If you have any health issues, ask your doctor what type of strength training is best to meet your needs and abilities. You can also work with a fitness expert to design a strength-training program that will be safe and effective for you.

Who doesn't want to look better, feel better, and live a longer, healthier life? So what are you waiting for? Get started now with a complete workout program that includes strength training.

15 ways to burn fat fast

1. Start Strength Training

Strength training is a type of exercise that requires you to contract your muscles against resistance. It builds muscle mass and increases strength.

Most commonly, strength training involves lifting weights to gain muscle over time.

Research has found strength training to have multiple health benefits, especially when it comes to burning fat.

In one study, strength training reduced visceral fat in 78 people with metabolic syndrome. Visceral fat is a type of dangerous fat that surrounds the organs in the belly (1).

Another study showed that 12 weeks of strength training paired with aerobic exercise was more effective at reducing body fat and belly fat than aerobic exercise alone (2).

Resistance training may also help preserve fat-free mass, which can increase the number of calories your body burns at rest (3).

According to one review, 10 weeks of resistance training could help increase calories burned at rest by 7% and may reduce fat weight by 4 pounds (1.8 kg) (4).

Doing body-weight exercises, lifting weights or using gym equipment are a few easy ways to get started with strength training. If you’re not sure how to proceed, hiring a personal trainer can take the guess-work out of it. Finding the best personal trainer is Los Angeles can be tricky. Often the best approach is word of mouth. Ask friends or family if they’ve worked with a good personal trainer before. Search yelp for personal trainers nearby. Be patient and wait for the right fit. Finding the best personal trainer is as important as your eventual workout plan.

SUMMARYStrength training has been shown to increase resting energy expenditure and reduce belly fat, especially when combined with aerobic exercise.

2. Follow a High-Protein Diet

Including more protein-rich foods in your diet is an effective way to reduce your appetite and burn more fat.

In fact, multiple studies have found that eating more high-quality protein is associated with a lower risk of belly fat (56).

One study also showed that a high-protein diet can help preserve muscle mass and metabolism during weight loss (7).

Upping your protein intake may also increase feelings of fullness, decrease appetite and reduce calorie intake to aid in weight loss (89).

Try incorporating a few servings of high-protein foods into your diet each day to help amp up fat burning.

Some examples of protein-rich foods include meat, seafood, eggs, legumes and dairy products.

SUMMARYEating more protein may be associated with a lower risk of belly fat. Increasing your protein intake can decrease appetite, lower calorie intake and preserve muscle mass.

3. Squeeze in More Sleep

Going to bed a bit earlier or setting your alarm clock a little later can help boost fat burning and prevent weight gain.

Several studies have found an association between getting enough sleep and weight loss.

One study of 68,183 women showed that those who slept five or fewer hours per night over a period of 16 years were more likely to gain weight than those who slept for longer than seven hours per night (10).

Another study showed that better sleep quality and getting at least seven hours of sleep per night increased the likelihood of successful weight loss by 33% in 245 women enrolled in a six-month weight loss program (11).

Other research shows that a lack of sleep may contribute to alterations in hunger hormones, increased appetite and a higher risk of obesity (12).

Although everyone needs a different amount of sleep, most studies have found that getting at least seven hours of sleep per night is associated with the most benefits when it comes to body weight.

Stick to a regular sleep schedule, limit your intake of caffeine and minimize your use of electronic devices before bed to help support a healthy sleep cycle.

SUMMARYGetting enough sleep may be associated with decreased appetite and hunger, as well as a lower risk of weight gain.

4. Add Vinegar to Your Diet

Vinegar is well known for its health-promoting properties.

In addition to its potential effects on heart health and blood sugar control, increasing your intake of vinegar may help bump up fat burning, according to some research (13).

One study found that consuming 1–2 tablespoons (15–30 ml) of vinegar daily reduced people’s body weight, belly fat and average waist circumference over a 12-week period (14).

Consuming vinegar has also been shown to enhance feelings of fullness and reduce appetite (15).

Another small study of 11 people showed that adding vinegar to the diet reduced daily calorie intake by up to 275 calories (16).

It’s easy to incorporate vinegar into your diet. For example, many people dilute apple cider vinegar with water and drink it as a beverage a few times per day with meals.

However, if drinking vinegar straight doesn’t sound appealing, you can also use it to make dressings, sauces and marinades.

SUMMARYVinegar may help increase feelings of fullness, decrease calorie intake and lower body fat.

5. Eat More Healthy Fats

Although it may seem counterintuitive, increasing your intake of healthy fats may actually help prevent weight gain and help you maintain feelings of fullness.

Fat takes a while to digest and can help slow the emptying of the stomach, which can reduce appetite and hunger (17).

One study found that following a Mediterranean diet rich in healthy fats from olive oil and nuts was associated with a lower risk of weight gain compared to a low-fat diet (18).

Another small study found that when people on a weight loss diet took two tablespoons (30 ml) of coconut oil daily, they lost more belly fat than those who were given soybean oil (19).

Meanwhile, unhealthy types of fat like trans fats have been shown to increase body fat, waist circumference and belly fat in human and animal studies (2021).

Olive oil, coconut oil, avocados, nuts and seeds are just a few examples of healthy types of fatthat may have beneficial effects on fat burning.

However, keep in mind that healthy fat is still high in calories, so moderate how much you consume. Instead of eating more fat overall, try swapping the unhealthy fats in your diet for these healthy fat varieties.

SUMMARYFat is digested slowly, so eating it can help reduce appetite. A higher intake of healthy fats is associated with a lower risk of weight gain and decreased belly fat.

6. Drink Healthier Beverages

Swapping out sugar-sweetened drinks for some healthier selections is one of the easiest ways to increase fat burning.

For example, sugar-sweetened beverages like soda and juice are packed with calories and offer little nutritional value.

Alcohol is also high in calories and has the added effect of lowering your inhibitions, making you more likely to overeat (22).

Studies have found that consuming both sugar-sweetened beverages and alcohol is associated with a higher risk of belly fat (2324).

Limiting your intake of these beverages can help reduce your calorie intake and keep your waistline in check.

Instead, opt for calorie-free beverages like water or green tea.

In one small, 12-week study, drinking 17 ounces (500 ml) of water before meals increased weight loss by 4.4 pounds (2 kg), compared to a control group (25).

Green tea is another great option. It contains caffeine and is rich in antioxidants, both of which may help increase fat burning and enhance metabolism (2627).

For instance, one study in 12 adults showed that green tea extract increased fat burning by 12% compared to a placebo (28).

Trading in even just one or two servings of high-calorie beverages for a glass of water or a cup of green tea is a simple way to promote fat burning.

SUMMARYSugar-sweetened beverages and alcoholic drinks may be associated with a higher risk of belly fat. Green tea and water have been shown to increase weight loss and fat burning.

7. Fill up on Fiber

Soluble fiber absorbs water and moves through the digestive tract slowly, helping you feel fuller for longer (29).

According to some studies, increasing your intake of high-fiber foods may protect against weight gain and fat accumulation.

One study of 1,114 adults found that for each 10-gram increase in soluble fiber intake per day, participants lost 3.7% of their belly fat over a five-year period, even without any other changes in diet or exercise (30).

Another review also found that increasing fiber intake promoted feelings of fullness and decreased hunger. In fact, an increase of 14 grams of fiber per day was associated with a 10% decrease in calorie intake.

Not only that, but it was also linked to nearly 4.4 pounds (2 kg) of weight loss over a four-month period (31).

Fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds are a few examples of high-fiber foods that can boost fat burning and weight loss.

SUMMARYA higher intake of fiber may be associated with fat loss, decreased calorie intake and greater weight loss.

8. Cut Down on Refined Carbs

Decreasing your intake of refined carbohydrates may help you lose extra fat.

During processing, refined grains are stripped of their bran and germ, resulting in a final product that’s low in fiber and nutrients.

Refined carbs also tend to have a higher glycemic index, which can cause spikes and crashes in blood sugar levels, resulting in increased hunger (32).

Studies show that a diet high in refined carbs may be associated with increased belly fat (3334).

Conversely, a diet high in whole grains has been associated with a lower body mass index and body weight, plus a smaller waist circumference (35).

One study in 2,834 people also showed that those with higher intakes of refined grains tended to have a higher amount of disease-promoting belly fat, while those who ate more whole grains tended to have a lower amount (36).

For the best results, reduce your intake of refined carbs from pastries, processed foods, pastas, white breads and breakfast cereals. Replace them with whole grains such as whole wheat, quinoa, buckwheat, barley and oats.

SUMMARYRefined carbs are low in fiber and nutrients. They may increase hunger and cause spikes and crashes in blood sugar levels. Consuming refined carbs has also been associated with increased belly fat.

9. Increase Your Cardio

Cardio, also known as aerobic exercise, is one of the most common forms of exercise and is defined as any type of exercise that specifically trains the heart and lungs.

Adding cardio to your routine may be one of the most effective ways to enhance fat burning.

For example, one review of 16 studies found that the more aerobic exercise people got, the more belly fat they lost (37).

Other studies have found that aerobic exercise can increase muscle mass and decrease belly fat, waist circumference and body fat (383940).

Most research recommends between 150–300 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise weekly, or roughly 20–40 minutes of cardio each day (41).

Running, walking, cycling and swimming are just a few examples of some cardio exercises that can help burn fat and kick-start weight loss.

SUMMARYStudies show that the more aerobic exercise people get, the more belly fat they tend to lose. Cardio may also help reduce waist circumference, lower body fat and increase muscle mass.

10. Drink Coffee

Caffeine is a primary ingredient in just about every fat-burning supplement, and for good reason.

The caffeine found in coffee acts as a central nervous system stimulant, increases metabolism and boosts the breakdown of fatty acids (42).

In fact, studies show that caffeine intake can temporarily increase energy expenditure and enhance metabolism by 3–11% (4344).

One large study with over 58,000 people found that increased caffeine intake was associated with less weight gain over a 12-year period (45).

Another study found that higher caffeine intake was linked to a higher rate of success with weight loss maintenance among 2,623 people (46).

To maximize the health benefits of coffee, skip the cream and sugar. Instead, enjoy it black or with a small amount of milk to prevent the extra calories from stacking up.

SUMMARYCoffee contains caffeine, which can increase the breakdown of fat and raise metabolism. Studies show that higher caffeine intake may be associated with greater weight loss.

11. Try High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)

High-intensity interval training, also known as HIIT, is a form of exercise that pairs quick bursts of activity with short recovery periods to keep your heart rate elevated.

Studies show that HIIT can be incredibly effective at ramping up fat burning and promoting weight loss.

One study found that young men performing HIIT for 20 minutes three times weekly lost an average of 4.4 pounds (2 kg) of body fat over a 12-week period, even with no other changes to their diet or lifestyle.

They also experienced a 17% reduction in belly fat as well as a significant decrease in waist circumference (47).

HIIT may also help you burn more calories in a shorter amount of time than other forms of cardio.

According to one study, performing HIIT helped people burn up to 30% more calories than other types of exercise, such as cycling or jogging, in the same amount of time (48).

For an easy way to get started with HIIT, try alternating between walking and jogging or sprinting for 30 seconds at a time.

You can also cycle between exercises like burpees, push-ups or squats with a short rest period in between.

SUMMARYHIIT can help increase fat burning and burn more calories in a shorter amount of time than other forms of exercise.

12. Add Probiotics to Your Diet

Probiotics are a type of beneficial bacteria found in your digestive tract that have been shown to improve many aspects of health.

In fact, the bacteria in your gut have been shown to play a role in everything from immunity to mental health (49).

Increasing your intake of probiotics through either food or supplements may also help rev up fat burning and keep your weight under control.

One review of 15 studies showed that people who took probiotics experienced significantly larger reductions in body weight, fat percentage and body mass index compared to those who took a placebo (50).

Another small study showed that taking probiotic supplements helped people following a high-fat, high-calorie diet prevent fat and weight gain (51).

Certain strains of probiotics in the genus Lactobacillus may be especially effective at aiding weight and fat loss.

One study in 28 people showed that eating yogurt containing either Lactobacillus fermentumor Lactobacillus amylovorus bacteria reduced body fat by 3–4% (52).

Taking supplements is a quick and easy way to get in a concentrated dose of probiotics every day.

Alternatively, you can try adding some probiotic-rich foods to your diet, such as kefir, tempeh, natto, kombucha, kimchi and sauerkraut.

SUMMARYTaking probiotic supplements or increasing your intake of probiotics through food sources may help reduce body weight and fat percentage.

13. Increase Your Iron Intake

Iron is an important mineral that has many vital functions in the body.

As with other nutrients such as iodine, a deficiency in iron may impact the health of your thyroid gland. This small gland in your neck secretes hormones that regulate your metabolism (53).

Multiple studies have found that low levels of iron in the body may be associated with impaired thyroid function and a disruption in the production of thyroid hormones (545556).

Common symptoms of hypothyroidism, or decreased thyroid function, include weakness, fatigue, shortness of breath and weight gain (57).

Similarly, a deficiency in iron can cause symptoms like fatigue, dizziness, headaches and shortness of breath (58).

Treating iron deficiency can allow your metabolism to work more efficiently and can fight off fatigue to help increase your activity level.

One study even found that when 21 women were treated for iron deficiency, they experienced reductions in body weight, waist circumference and body mass index (59).

Unfortunately, many people don’t get enough iron in their diets.

Women, infants, children, vegans and vegetarians are all at a higher risk of iron deficiency.

Be sure to incorporate plenty of iron-rich foods in your diet to help meet your iron needs and maintain your metabolism and energy levels.

You can find iron in meat, poultry, seafood, fortified grains and cereals, leafy green vegetables, dried fruits and beans.

SUMMARYA deficiency in iron may be associated with impaired thyroid function and can cause symptoms like fatigue and shortness of breath. One study found that treating iron deficiency aided in weight loss.

14. Give Intermittent Fasting a Shot

Intermittent fasting is a diet pattern that involves cycling between periods of eating and fasting.

Research shows that intermittent fasting may help enhance both weight loss and fat loss.

One review looked at the effects of intermittent fasting, including alternate-day fasting — a method that involves alternating between days of fasting and eating normally.

They found that alternate-day fasting over a period of 3–12 weeks reduced body weight by up to 7% and decreased body fat by up to 12 pounds (5.5 kg) (60).

Another small study showed that eating only during an eight-hour window each day helped decrease fat mass and maintain muscle mass when combined with resistance training (61).

There are several different types of intermittent fasting, including some where you eat only on certain days of the week and others where eating is restricted to specific hours of the day.

Popular types of intermittent fasting include Eat Stop Eat, the Warrior Diet, the 16/8 method and the 5:2 diet.

Find a variation that fits in with your schedule and lifestyle and don’t be afraid to experiment to find what works best for you.

SUMMARYIntermittent fasting has been shown to reduce body weight and body fat and may help preserve muscle mass when combined with resistance training.

The Bottom Line

There are plenty of options available to help you shed excess fat and improve your health.

Incorporating some healthy habits into your routine and switching up your diet can make a big difference. Even minor changes to your lifestyle can have powerful effects on fat burning.

Be sure to pair these simple tips with a nutritious, well-rounded diet and active lifestyle to simultaneously boost fat breakdown and improve your overall health.

The best way to burn calories and lose weight

Many people think that if you want to lose fat, you should do more cardio, and that if you want to build muscle, you should lift weights. But it's not that simple. You can use weight training to lose fat, and in some ways it's actually better than cardio. But weight training isn’t as simple as running, so it often helps to start your fitness project by finding the right personal trainer to teach you how to lift weights the right way.

Falling for the common misconception that you need to do cardio to lose weight is one of the biggest mistakes you could make and could hinder your progress.

Weight Training Increases Short-Term Calorie Burn

The first reason we are going to give weight training a point in the fat-loss war against cardio is due to the calorie burn after the workout is completed.

Studies have demonstrated that after a weight-training workout with an experienced personal trainer, metabolism can be boosted for up to 38 hours post-workout.[1] This means that rather than burning, say, 60 calories an hour while sitting and watching TV, you're burning 70. While you may not think that 10 extra calories is a big deal, when you multiply this by 38 hours, you can see what a huge difference it can make in your daily calorie expenditure.

When you figure that out on a monthly rate, it becomes even clearer how regular participation in weight training will really increase your capacity to burn calories, and thus fat.

With cardio training, you might get an extra 40-80 calories burned after a moderately paced session, but this will depend upon the exact intensity and duration of the workout. In order to generate a high amount of post-calorie burn from aerobics, you'd have to be doing it for a very long duration of time.

Sprinting is a slightly different story and will create effects with your metabolic rate closer to that of weight lifting, so that's something to consider as well. However, you must be sprinting hard in order to see the benefits, which is something some people struggle with.

Weight Training Increases Long-Term Calorie Burn

The second factor to consider in the fat-loss war is long-term metabolic increases. While it's great to be burning more calories for 38 hours after the workout, that's not going to help you two weeks from now, unless you are consistent with your workout program (which you should be, but that's not the point we're trying to make here).

What weight training will enable you to do is build up a larger degree of lean muscle mass, which then basically serves as a calorie-burning powerhouse in the body.

When you calculate your basal metabolic rate, which is how many calories you would burn if you stayed in bed all day and did absolutely nothing except breathe, one of the factors that goes into this is your total body weight. The most accurate equations will also take into account lean body mass, which represents your muscles, bones, and organs.

The more muscle you have on your body, the higher this rate will be and the better the calorie-burning results you will obtain 24/7.[2]

Since muscle tissue is fairly stable (as long as there is some stimulus on the muscle and you are consuming enough protein, it won't be lost), this proves to be an effective long-term strategy for losing body fat.

This is the primary reason males can typically eat more than females without gaining weight—they have more lean muscle mass on their body, thus they are burning more calories around-the-clock.

To add to this point, it's critical that you are realistic with how much muscle mass you can build in a given period of time. Naturally, males will be able to generate between 1-2 pounds of pure muscle mass in a given month and females will get about half that, around 0.5-1 pound. Over time, though, with consistent effort, this will make you dramatically more resistant to weight gain as you grow older, making it extremely beneficial.

Weight Training with a Personal Trainer, and Total Body Reshaping

Another big benefit that weight training has over cardio training is that it will allow you to completely reshape your body. That’s why a personal trainer is so important. They know which exercises change the shape of your body, and which exercises don’t. Cardio training will generally help you lose weight, however, this weight loss is typically a combination of fat and muscle, so what you're left with is a smaller version of your current self.

When you are performing resistance training, while following a calorie-restricted diet, then you stand a better chance of losing strictly body fat, while helping to enhance the natural curves of your body.[3]

This will give you a much better overall transformation than if you just lost weight doing cardio. If you've ever noticed someone who has lost a considerable amount of weight but still looks somewhat "soft," that's usually why—they have lost some fat, but their muscles aren't overly toned.

Weight Training For Women

One thing that should be mentioned at this point is that many women will shy away from lifting weights, particularly more than 5-10 pounds, simply because they believe doing so will cause them to develop large amounts of muscle. This is an unfortunate misconception because females do not have high enough testosterone levels naturally to develop the same amount of musculature as males. Ask any personal trainer why women get big from lifting weight. They simply do not. Ever.

What lifting heavy weights will do—for men and women—is raise the metabolic rate, promote greater fat burning, and help give more definition when the body fat comes off.

Cardio And Calorie Burn

One issue you're more than likely thinking about is the different calorie burns during the actual workout—that's got to count for something, right?

Correct! If you do a longer cardio session, you could burn somewhere in the neighborhood of 500-800 calories, depending on the exact length and intensity level. That is a fairly decent number and will definitely help with your fat-loss goals.

Since you must burn off 3,500 calories in order to lose one pound of body fat, if you do enough of these cardio sessions, and make sure you're keeping track of your macronutrient intake, weight loss will take place.

But, keep in mind that you are going to have to keep doing those long cardio sessions. Time will likely become a big factor with this one, and boredom could start to play a role over time, too.

While a weight-training session may not burn as many calories per minute during the actual workout (although that can depend on how intense the weight lifting is), the overall calorie-burning benefits you receive from it typically outweigh those of cardio.

Cardio And Health Benefits

One point does have to go to cardio for health benefits. Obviously strength training has health benefits as well, but cardio training has a bigger influence on cardiovascular health, since your heart and lungs work harder for longer when you do it.[4]

So, while you likely shouldn't entirely eliminate cardio from your fat-loss training program, you should be putting forth good effort toward weight training as well. Overlooking this form of exercise while playing the fat-loss game is a big mistake that's going to hurt your progress.

Conclusion

It's time to break free from the thinking that cardio equates to fat loss and weight training equates to building muscle and weight gain. It's simply not as clear cut as that. While doing cardio can help your fat-loss goals, in a lot of ways weight training is more effective and will also give you a more toned body shape.

While lifting weights can help you build muscle mass, that muscle mass will in turn help you lose fat mass. And if you just want to lose fat and don't want to get hugely muscular, don't worry, that takes a lot of concentrated effort and won't happen just by showing up to the weight room a few times a week.

If losing fat is your goal, lifting weights can only help you, so make it a priority.

References

  1. Schuenke, M. D., Mikat, R. P., & McBride, J. M. (2002). Effect of an acute period of resistance exercise on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption: implications for body mass managementEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology, 86(5), 411-417.

  2. Stiegler, P., & Cunliffe, A. (2006). The role of diet and exercise for the maintenance of fat-free mass and resting metabolic rate during weight lossSports Medicine, 36(3), 239-262.

  3. Bryner, R. W., Ullrich, I. H., Sauers, J., Donley, D., Hornsby, G., Kolar, M., & Yeater, R. (1999). Effects of resistance vs. aerobic training combined with an 800 calorie liquid diet on lean body mass and resting metabolic rateJournal of the American College of Nutrition, 18(2), 115-121.

  4. Fletcher, G. F., Blair, S. N., Blumenthal, J., Caspersen, C., Chaitman, B., Epstein, S., ... & Piña, I. L. (1992). Statement on exercise: benefits and recommendations for physical activity programs for all Americans-a statement for health professionals by the Committee on Exercise and Cardiac Rehabilitation of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, American Heart AssociationCirculation, 86(1), 340.



Find the best personal trainer for you

There are so many variables to finding a personal trainer in Los Angeles. In the end, you have to go with your gut. But while your gut is deciding, here are some questions to ask your potential trainer, or yourself, during your search.

1. What kind of (and how much) experience does your personal trainer have?
We used to believe that mastery of a skill came after 10,000 hours of deliberate practice. However the popular “practice-makes-perfect” theory has been debunked in favor of the more nuanced idea that “smart practice makes perfect.” In other words, when it comes to learning a skill, it’s the quality of time spent practicing, not the number of hours logged, that transform a novice into a virtuoso. One building block of high-quality practice is swift recognition and correction of mistakes. How is this relevant to your prospective personal trainer in Los Angeles? Personal Trainers learn whether or not their methodologies work in real time, making adjustments along the way to help clients reach their goals. In this way, the more experience your trainer has, the better. Plus, studies show that teaching is a great way to learn . The best personal trainers have been teaching proper technique for a long timed has likely gotten better and better at providing the right cues to help you get the most out of every single training session. Once you’ve gotten a handle on how long a personal trainer has been successful in Los Angeles, don’t forget to ask what kind of experience your personal trainers have. Whether you’re brand new to working out or an experienced athlete looking for sports-specific training, you’ll want a personal trainer who knows how to work with someone just like you. A few things to consider: fitness level, age, health status, fitness interests, or any other particulars you think might be important.

2. What is your personal trainer’s strategy for preventing and dealing with injuries?
Many of us deal with nagging aches and pains or recurring injuries and we’re unsure how to get a great workout without causing a flare-up. If you're nursing an old injury, your personal trainer should be capable of adjusting your training to work around it. For any new injuries, they'll recommend seeing a physician before going back into beast mode.

3. Do they specialize in any training styles?
The NCCA stamp of approval might be enough to make you feel comfortable, confident, and ready to book your first session, but if you have specific goals (conquering a handstand, getting in shape for surfing, swinging a kettlebell like a pro) or have always been curious about a particular kind of workout (suspension training, anyone?), you might want to make sure your trainer is someone who can lead the way. Find out if they’ve been formally instructed in a given area and are certified to teach it. Maybe you’d like someone with a YogaFit credential, a CrossFit Level I cert, or a certificate in kettlebell liftsTRXPilatesmind-body training, and so on. Many trainers pursue continuing education in dizzying array of other areas, from plyometrics and nutrition for marathoners to glutes and low-back pain! (Click here to see some lesser-known certifications offered by ACE you might want to seek out.)

4. What's the fine print re: cost, location, and availability?
Los Angeles is a big city. And you don’t have a lot of extra time, so it’s important to find a personal trainer close by in your neighborhood. If you live in Echo Park, you don’t have time to drive to Hollywood for a workout. If you live in Los Feliz, why drove to West LA to see a personal trainer? There are plenty of great trainers on the Eastside of Los Angeles. A great personal trainer is worth his or her weight in gold. But for many people, the personal trainer we choose has more to do with the amount of gold we have to spend. Do some comparison shopping to find out average rates in Los Angeles. Now days, personal trainers in Los Angeles can cost as much as $300 per session. If a personal trainer seems out of your budget, you have a couple of options. Some trainers offer lower rates for semi-private workouts, which are something between one-on-one training and a group class. You can also inquire about discounts for buying sessions in bulk. Alternatively, consider looking at working with a trainer as an added bonus to your workout routine (as opposed to the only time you exercise). For example, ask your prospective personal trainer about possible arrangements where you might meet in-person less frequently but follow their program between sessions. It’s also a good idea to inquire about their schedule—if they tend to meet clients at the same time each week, how far in advance they book appointments, their cancellation policy, and whether it’s possible to make up missed sessions.

5. What is their coaching style?
When it comes to client-trainer compatibility, personality and training style are crucial. Consider your own learning style first. If you’re someone who picks up a movement by having it broken down into its smallest components and demonstrated repeatedly, be sure to choose a trainer who is interested in the minutiae of exercise and has the patience to go through the details.

Next up: the personality of your ideal personal trainer. Do you want a cheerleader who will remind you of how awesome you are for making the effort, or do you need a stern, drill sergeant-type who is more likely to tell you to go harder, faster, and heavier than congratulate you on each small victory? Either one (and anything in between) is fine! One study found that trainees were more successful when they received ongoing social support from their trainers . On the other hand, some clients might be self-sufficient when it comes to motivation and gel with a trainer who encourages autonomy. Although you can get plenty of answers by asking your maybe-future-trainer all about their methodologies and how they see their own styles and attitudes, checking in with someone who trains with them could offer additional insight. Ask for references to get the inside scoop on what it's like to be the trainer’s client—like their pet peeve about punctuality or how adept they are at explaining and instruction.

6. Do they stay on top of fitness trends and related research?
Extensive fitness knowledge and expertise is a main reason why people want to work with personal trainers. Your trainer should be able to speak about a variety of training styles and the advantages and drawbacks of each. Most trainers have their own opinion about what gets results, but the best ones aren't so married to one particular modality that they won’t be versatile in their programming. According to ACE expert Jessica Matthews, if you happen to catch your trainer using the same exercises and routines with other clients, it could be that he or she might not understand the “why” behind your workout and how specific exercises will help you to reach your goals. The best trainers are the ones who love what they do (same is true for any profession). And loving what you do often translates into always wanting to improve and expand your knowledge so you can keep getting better at your job. If your prospective trainer seems less than passionate about continuing his or her education—or thinks that he or she already knows all there is to know about fitness—it's probably a good idea to consider working with someone else, Matthews says.

Good luck, and happy training!